Caramel Creme Eggs

Raw chocolate filled with gooey raw caramel in a delicious egg. At half the sugar content of a Cadbury Caramel Egg, try this for a healthier Easter egg option!

15 min
12
Level: Easy

INGREDIENTS

Chocolate:

  • 2/3 cup coconut oil
  • 1/3 cup cacao powder
  • 3 Tbsp agave nectar syrup
  • Pinch himalayan pink salt

Caramel:

  • 5 medjool dates, pitted
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 Tbsp almond butter
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • Pinch himalayan pink salt

DIRECTIONS

  1. If the coconut oil has solidified, melt under a low temperature and stir until smooth. If you have a Thermomix or like machine, use the 37 degrees setting to keep the oil raw.
  2. Add the cacao, agave and salt and mix until smooth.
  3. Pour the chocolate into Easter egg moulds until they are about 1/3 full. Freeze until firm (about 10 minutes).
  4. Place all the caramel ingredients into a food processor and process on medium-high speed until smooth. Scrape down the sides and continue processing until very smooth.
  5. Spoon the caramel mixture into a small snap lock bag and seal. Snip a tiny section of one corner (about 5mm) and squeeze caramel into the centre of each egg, leaving a bit of room on top to cover it with more chocolate.
  6. Pour the remaining chocolate over the caramel until the mould is full. Reserve 2 tablespoons of the chocolate mixture for later. Freeze until set.
  7. To make a full egg, dab a small amount of the reserved chocolate into the centre of an egg half and sandwich it together with another half. Since the eggs have just come out of the freezer the dab should set immediately, if not return to the freezer until set.

RAW TIP:

  1. Caramel Creme Eggs will become soft if left out for long so keep them refrigerated.

This recipe is featured in The Raw Food Girl's Sweets & Treats eBook, along with 50 others nutritiously raw snacks.

A word from The Raw Food Girl

When I'm feeling generous enough to pop a treat in my kids lunch boxes, this is usually it. It's a good source of carbohydrates and omegas, and contains some actual nutrition.

When I was at school, everyone took an Uncle Toby's muesli bar to munch on at recess time. And I mean everyone. I think all the mums of that decade must have received a universal memo that told them these bars were legit. Super healthy and all that.

Us kids certainly didn't mind - we licked our empty packets clean. Especially when it was a Yoghurt Topp day...

Let's have a closer look at the ingredients list of an Uncle Toby's Strawberry Yoghurt Topp Bar:

"Wholegrain cereals (47%) [Uncle Tobys Rolled Oats (35%), whole grain wheat (12%)], glucose (wheat), yoghurt compound [sugar, vegetable fat, skim yoghurt powder (1.4%), whey powder, emulsifiers (soy lecithin, 492), food acid (citric)], wheat puffs (wholemeal wheat flour (5%), wheat starch, sugar, antioxidant [307b]), strawberry fruit pieces [strawberry puree (1%)] (wheat), dietary fibre (inulin), sunflower oil (soy), sugar, humectant (glycerine), modified wheat starch (1412), coconut (sulphites), berry juice concentrate (strawberry (0.6%), invert sugar, honey, skim milk powder, flavour, emulsifier (soy lecithin), preservative (223) (sulphites)"

Pretty lengthy right? More than a few random numbers hidden in their too.

I stumbled upon the reviews for Strawberry Yoghurt Topp bars when I was checking out the nutritional label, and was very interested to discover that every single rating was marked at 1: Terrible. EVERY. SINGLE. ONE.

Skimming briefly through them, it appears that Uncle Toby's have recently changed the recipe for these bars, most likely to earn themselves a 4 star health rating for it. Unfortunately for them, it seems that their trusty loyal customers think the healthy new ones taste like rubbish. Ouch.

If pre-packaged muesli bars really are your thing, then indulge just once in a while. But please do try to keep the ingredients list to ones you understand. And preferably can pronounce. By making them yourself you control exactly what goes into it, and assures you that you are in fact eating 'real food' - which is what true health is all about.

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